GMO Maize NOT equivalent!

An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process

Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as ‘substantially equivalent’ to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism.

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep37855

Organic farming: better for the climate, soil conservation, biodiversity and food security

Organic farming: better for the climate, soil conservation, biodiversity and food security

This news will be of particular interest to those who have read about animal factory-farming methods (see the work of Tracy Worcester) and those who were earlier stunned by the exposure of systemic pesticides in ‘Roots of Evil’ (The Guardian 29.4.95) by Joanna Blythman.

In 2016, Scheherazade Daneshkhu, Consumer Industries Editor for the Financial Times, reported that home deliveries of organic vegetables have almost returned to pre-recession levels - £2.1bn in 2008.There has also been a higher demand for organic jam, tea, oils, organic cotton clothes and beauty products.

She cited the Soil Association’s 2016 Market Report, free to members, which recorded that sales of organic products rose last year by 4.9% to £1.95bn in the UK - the third year of consecutive growth for the UK organic sector, now worth £1.95bn. Sales of non-organic food dropped by 0.9%.

SNIP!

The Organic Research Centre is the UK’s leading independent research centre for the development of organic food production and land management solutions to climate change, soil and biodiversity conservation and food security.

Its detailed financial report on organic farming in England and Wales for 2014/15, published two months later also showed organic farm profits increasing, with organic dairy farming outperforming conventional dairy farming in England and Wales .

Read on: https://foodvitalpublicservice.wordpress.com/2017/01/04/organic-farming-better-for-the-climate-soil-conservation-biodiversity-and-food-security/

New Research Shows Failings of GMO Insect Resistance, Corn Crop in Jeopardy

New research adds to evidence that the effectiveness of popular genetically engineered traits used to protect corn and cotton from insects is failing, putting U.S. corn production potential in jeopardy, and spurring a need for increased insecticide use.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carey-gillam/new-research-shows-failin_b_14003604.html

TTIP and CETA - What are TTIP and CETA about?

CETA: An assault on democracy

Food for Future Report on Seed resilience for sustainable food systems

FUTURE OF FOOD: SEEDS OF RESILIENCE A COMPENDIUM OF PERSPECTIVES ON AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY FROM AROUND THE WORLD:

KEY MESSAGES
  1. Diverse and robust local seed systems are central to sustainable food systems that are renewable, resilient, equitable, diverse, healthy, and interconnected.
  2. Farmers have a crucial role in improving seed varieties and enhancing agricultural biodiversity, a role they have played throughout the history of agriculture.
  3. Indigenous, local, and traditional knowledge and practices are central to resilient seed systems.
  4. The value of resilient and diverse seed systems goes far beyond any economic measure. Community based seed systems are connected to diverse cultural and culinary traditions, health and wellness, resilient agroecological landscapes, and sustainable local economies.
  5. Maintaining and enhancing agricultural biodiversity is critical in light of global challenges such as climate change, and food and nutrition security.
  6. There is an urgent need to support community based and farmer managed seed systems in order to protect and enhance agricultural biodiversity.
  7. Farmers should not be limited in their ability to access, exchange and improve the seeds they use—whether they are locally managed, government produced, or commercial seed varieties from other regions of the world.
  8. Farmers’ organizations, especially those led by smallholders, women and Indigenous farmers, need greater voice and influence in the development of local seed policy as well as the international governance systems that affect and regulate seeds.
  9. There is great potential in farmers and the more formal seed establishment coming together to co-create solutions where they have a common agenda.
  10. Strategic opportunities for positive change include: to continue to research and document the importance of community based seed systems, to support seed leaders to engage in policy advocacy, and to leverage additional funding from philanthropy, governments, and bilateral agencies for community based seed systems.
Read more <<<

Additional information

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